Thursday

Transparency-- a new meaning?


A shift-- from private to public, from isolation to collaboration in learning-- Doesn't the potential for deeper understanding, for more accomplished practice outweigh any reluctance holding us back?
"Blogging is an “outering” of the private mind in a public way (that in turn leads to the multi-way participation that is again characteristic of multi-way instantaneous communications). Unlike normal conversation that is essentially private but interactive, and unlike broadcast that is inherently not interactive but public, blogging is interactive, public and, of course, networked - that is to say, interconnected. (2004)" --Lowe and Williams

"Learning involves encountering something new, and reflecting on it. But it's not solitary reflection, but coming to a better understanding in collaboration with others." --Miguel Guhlin A great transparency story in this post--

"All of this boils down to a natural fear of transparency. Going public, or in the case of blogs, global, with the work we all do in education can be frightening and intimidating. We all fear being judged negatively when we take a risk and try something outside the mainstream. It would be quite a blow to my ego and self-esteem to be told that I'm a terrible teacher. Making my process in the classroom transparent opens me up to criticism and, like you, I don't like to be criticized. On the other hand, being aware of my shortcomings engenders and encourages growth -- I become a better teacher. I have learned more about teaching and learning in the last ten months then I have in the previous ten years; all because of blogging. Everything I've ever done that has helped me to become a better teacher has been the result of taking a chance -- taking a risk. Taking risks for the purpose of growing and learning is something I try to teach my students in the classroom every day. If I don't take risks myself how can I possibly teach my students to do so? If administrators and superintendents (our leaders) don't take risks, how can they possibly expect teachers to do so?" --Darren Kuropatwa

"You should do it because you want to articulate your thinking and make your ideas transparent to a growing community of critics who can force you to rethink and revise. You should do it because you want to connect your thinking to the thinking of others and create new notions together. You should do it because you want to learn—and because you know that learning requires interaction." --Bill Ferriter


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